ty cole news

a photographer's web log of images and updates
Neuehouse for Departures Magazine’s Home & Design Issue. Photos by yours truly.

Neuehouse for Departures Magazine’s Home & Design Issue. Photos by yours truly.

Ralph Lauren Home for Departures Magazine’s Home & Design Issue

Ralph Lauren Home for Departures Magazine’s Home & Design Issue

Departures Magazine’s Home & Design issue is out with the cover story shot by yours truly! Aside from the feature story on Richard Mishaan I also shot a story on Ralph Lauren’s Home showroom in NYC and on the creative communal workspace, Neuehouse. 

Communication Arts Photo Annual 2014

I’m very honored to have 4 images selected to appear in the editorial section of Communication Arts 2014 Photography Annual. I’m thrilled with what was chosen and when the issue is out I’ll write a little more about how the images came to be. 

Outtake from Goodyear Blimp for ESPN the Magazine, 

Outtake from Goodyear Blimp for ESPN the Magazine, 

Outtake from Goodyear Blimp for ESPN the Magazine.

Outtake from Goodyear Blimp for ESPN the Magazine.

Did you know that Akron, OH is/was home to the 4 largest tire manufacturers, including Goodyear? Which brings us to this post. ESPN the Magazine sent me to the “rubber capital of the world” to photograph the newly unveiled Goodyear Blimp. I wish I could say we went up for a flight but it was anchored down in the hangar but it was OK. They keep that hangar as clean as german porsche garage, immaculate. The new blimp is supposedly all teched out. This one has a bathroom! You’d think all of them would have a bathroom but they didn’t. I have a good friend who is a sports photographer, Rob Tringali, and he was in the blimp for a baseball all-star game one year. That particular game went into extra innings and they were up there for hours. He asked “what if I have to go to the bathroom”? The answer he got was “bring a gatorade bottle”. Awesome. 
Thanks to Kaitlin Marron for the assignment. 

Did you know that Akron, OH is/was home to the 4 largest tire manufacturers, including Goodyear? Which brings us to this post. ESPN the Magazine sent me to the “rubber capital of the world” to photograph the newly unveiled Goodyear Blimp. I wish I could say we went up for a flight but it was anchored down in the hangar but it was OK. They keep that hangar as clean as german porsche garage, immaculate. The new blimp is supposedly all teched out. This one has a bathroom! You’d think all of them would have a bathroom but they didn’t. I have a good friend who is a sports photographer, Rob Tringali, and he was in the blimp for a baseball all-star game one year. That particular game went into extra innings and they were up there for hours. He asked “what if I have to go to the bathroom”? The answer he got was “bring a gatorade bottle”. Awesome. 

Thanks to Kaitlin Marron for the assignment. 

In the year 1938 Frank Lloyd Wright proposed a plan for a convention center in his hometown of Madison, Wisconsin called Monona Terrace. The plan was initially canned by the county. Wright continued to revise his design (FLW is notorious for changing his design. I visited his home/studio in Oak Park and he was constantly changing the design, experimenting with new ideas. I think that’s pretty awesome) and garner support for the project but the money just wasn’t there and then WWII broke out, project shelved. 
In 1990, 52 years later, a new mayor pulled Wright’s proposal back off the shelf. After years Wright’s proposal finally passed and in 1994 construction began. 
At the end of last year I got a call from Jay Gullixson, an art buyer at Hiebing who holds the Monona Terrace marketing account. They asked me to work on an advertisement for the convention center. They liked the fact that I shoot architecture and people and how the two relate to one another (score!). I was awarded the job and worked with Jay and the art director, Rich Matheson, and we shot it this past January. I had a blast working with those guys and hoping to visit Madison again very soon. Hopefully when it won’t be -15 degrees outside. 

In the year 1938 Frank Lloyd Wright proposed a plan for a convention center in his hometown of Madison, Wisconsin called Monona Terrace. The plan was initially canned by the county. Wright continued to revise his design (FLW is notorious for changing his design. I visited his home/studio in Oak Park and he was constantly changing the design, experimenting with new ideas. I think that’s pretty awesome) and garner support for the project but the money just wasn’t there and then WWII broke out, project shelved. 

In 1990, 52 years later, a new mayor pulled Wright’s proposal back off the shelf. After years Wright’s proposal finally passed and in 1994 construction began. 

At the end of last year I got a call from Jay Gullixson, an art buyer at Hiebing who holds the Monona Terrace marketing account. They asked me to work on an advertisement for the convention center. They liked the fact that I shoot architecture and people and how the two relate to one another (score!). I was awarded the job and worked with Jay and the art director, Rich Matheson, and we shot it this past January. I had a blast working with those guys and hoping to visit Madison again very soon. Hopefully when it won’t be -15 degrees outside. 

In the movie Contact, Jodi Foster plays an ambitious astronomer that made it her goal to find life elsewhere in our vast universe. I believe the line she muttered as an 11yr old was “I’m going to need a bigger telescope.” The scene directly after that line was the reveal of Arecibo Observatory, a radio telescope in Arecibo, Puerto Rico and the start of Jodi’s romance with Matthew McConaughey. Indeed she had found herself a bigger telescope. In fact it is the largest radio telescope in the world. The main dish measures 1,000ft in diameter and is situated in a sink hole. That is actually why this particular spot was chosen. It also helped that Puerto Rico is the closest location in the US to the equator. The sink hole, more specifically a karst sinkhole, was almost a perfect fit for the curvature of the dish. The dish is a combination of 38,778 perforated aluminum panels supported by a mesh of steel cables. They can manipulate the networked panels to focus in on a particular location. The large track system, to which the dome is connected, can line up in conjunction with the dish to a point in space to detect radio waves. The telescope can receive radio waves that are emitted from pulsars and even quasars and galaxies. That’s a long ways away. We are talking 100 million light years. The dome, called the gregorian dome, receives the signals from outer space and also receives signals that are emitted from their own antennas. That would be the long rod pointing directly towards the dish. The radio signal is sent out into space and bounces back off an object (i.e. satellites, planets, etc..) and those waves are analyzed and can reveal a ton of data. Just like sonar but with radio waves. 

My wife and I visited the observatory last month while on vacation. It’s a good drive from San Juan, with some really sketchy roads, but well worth it. 

I only skimmed the surface here so jump over to their website for more info, www.naic.edu.

Back in 2010 I ran across a video of craftsmen in Alabama for a personal project. One of these craftsmen was Gene Ivey, a master fiddle maker. I contacted him to ask if I could stop by his studio and shoot his portrait and still lifes. He couldn’t have been any nicer. I learned today that Mr. Ivey passed away. I cannot express how lucky I feel to have spent a few hours with him. This man was a very special person, one of a kind. 

I did a small little write up about my experience with him on my older blog. And you can watch the video of him here. Skip to 1:10 for his portion. 

New Work for mcgarrybowen and Residence Inn

The challenging aspect of shooting small, furnished interiors are exactly that, they’re small and furnished (furnished in this context means that there is existing furniture and I don’t have the option to switch out anything). It’s these restrictions that I enjoy. Limited space, limited light, specific client needs etc… It’s figuring out how all of these pieces fit together and how it works best. Remember that scene in Apollo 13 where they have to create an air filter out of existing parts from the lunar module? It’s sort’ve like that but the consequences are different, only by a little. 

This was the challenge when the good people at mcgarrybowen asked me to shoot the national branding images for Residence Inn’s newly redesigned hotel rooms. All of the interior images, and fire pit image, are from out shoot. The goal was to convey the spaciousness of the rooms. As far as hotel rooms go they are quite spacious but photographically, not so much.  Personally I do not like extreme wide angle lenses and the drastic perspective they create. I knew I needed to figure out a way to shoot the rooms so they appeared spacious without that exaggerated perspective (ah, the restrictions, albeit, partly self imposed.) When it comes to composition it’s the very minor perspective shifts that aren’t even noticeable, without close examination or trained eye. I believe it is a subconscious reaction that something is different but you’re not sure what. Subtlety is the key (this is more evident in the one point perspective compositions). By using a tilt/shift lens system, with a mid-wide lens, I was able to shift around capturing different pieces of the room, but the lens stays in place, and we stitched those views together. This has multiple effects. By using a longer lens the room appears compressed and your eye is able to focus on all aspects of the room plus we achieve our wide view. The compression does make the room seem a little smaller, compared to using a super wide lens, but we found the right balance that we were happy with. Not too small, no exaggerated perspective, just right. Not all of the images were captured using this technique but we did utilize it on the “hero” image you see on Residence Inn’s homepage

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(another) Death Valley, CA. December 2013

(another) Death Valley, CA. December 2013

Death Valley, CA  December 2013

Death Valley, CA  December 2013

Another Coyote. Love these guys. 
Death Valley, CA December 2013

Another Coyote. Love these guys. 

Death Valley, CA December 2013

My bro, John Kealey, shot a really cool story on medicinal marijuana for Bloomberg Businessweek.
johnkealey:

outtake from a story on Tweed Inc. for Bloomberg Businessweek.

My bro, John Kealey, shot a really cool story on medicinal marijuana for Bloomberg Businessweek.

johnkealey:

outtake from a story on Tweed Inc. for Bloomberg Businessweek.